EMMA AND THE CIVIL WARRIOR

One of three finalists for the 2002 Southeast Booksellers Association's Award for Children's Books

One of three finalists for the 2002 Independent Publisher Juvenile/Young Adult Fiction Book Award  

 

"This novel is a story of loss and recovery that works on multiple levels to give its readers a better understanding of civilian and military life in the Spring of 1865 - set against a chaotic background that was the Civil War's conclusion on Tar Heel soil. It is both as poignant and as inspirational in its message of hope and reconciliation as that sent heavenwards from the Capitol's dome on the evening of April 26, 1865." 

-Raymond Beck, Former North Carolina State Capitol Historian 

"I incorporate EMMA AND THE CIVIL WARRIOR into my lessons in social studies, language arts, and character education. Historical events are described from a variety of perspectives, leading to enthusiastic class discussions. The complex issues relating to slavery are handled in a manner that students can readily comprehend. Emma faces a variety of dilemmas that call on her to make difficult decisions. History becomes real to readers as they face Emma's choices along with her."

-Caryn Messinger, Teacher

 

 

Join Emma and five-year-old Micah as they risk everything to honor their father and save their city. Can a certain Union lieutenant turn their Confederate fervor into forgiveness and acceptance and allow peace to prevail?      "Candy Dahl has made the difficult look easy. Her engaging tale brings to life a city and a people in crisis and makes you care about them. The history is sound, the fictional characters are brave and noble, and the moral is unbeatable: peace is always better than war. Those who thought history was dull stuff are in for a sweet surprise."                                                        - Dennis Rogers, Former Columnist,               Raleigh News & Observer        

Join Emma and five-year-old Micah as they risk everything to honor their father and save their city. Can a certain Union lieutenant turn their Confederate fervor into forgiveness and acceptance and allow peace to prevail? 

"Candy Dahl has made the difficult look easy. Her engaging tale brings to life a city and a people in crisis and makes you care about them. The history is sound, the fictional characters are brave and noble, and the moral is unbeatable: peace is always better than war. Those who thought history was dull stuff are in for a sweet surprise."                                                   

-Dennis Rogers, Former Columnist,               Raleigh News & Observer